Pythagoras of Samos

Pythagoras of Samos (c. 570 – c. 495 BC) was an Ionian Greek philosopher and the eponymous founder of the Pythagoreanism movement. His political and religious teachings influenced the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and, through them, Western philosophy.

It was said that he was the first man to call himself a philosopher (“lover of wisdom”)

One of the best known mathematical formulas is Pythagorean Theorem, which provides us with the relationship between the sides in a right triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.

His teaching most securely identified with Pythagoras is metempsychosis, or the “transmigration of souls”, which holds that every soul is immortal and, upon death, enters into a new body. Pythagoras may have claimed to possess the ability to recall his former incarnations.

Another belief attributed to Pythagoras was that of the “harmony of the spheres”, which maintained that the planets and stars move according to mathematical equations, which correspond to musical notes and thus produce an inaudible symphony. The Pythagoreans believed that music was a purification for the soul, just as medicine was a purification for the body.

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